Posts Tagged ‘Television’

Mashable posted a rumor about Google working on streaming network TV shows via YouTube at $1.99 an episode. The price comes from Apple fixing the price of TV shows at $1.99 on iTunes.

At first glance, this might see too expensive, but let’s examine the real economics. The average cable bill is roughly $50/month. At $2/episode, you’d get 25 shows per month. That’s roughly 6 weekly shows… Now, some shows have double episodes (American Idol, Dancing with the Stars, etc.) So, that goes to 3 of those shows per month. That’s if you are paying basic cable. One can easily get up to $80+/month in cable bills w/o even counting their cable modem.

For people who are stuck with Time Warner Cable (like me), I’m paying $60/month for cable + all the ridiculous taxes on that junk. I don’t watch that much TV. In fact, the NFL is pretty much the only thing I’ll watch regularly. Everything else is here and there. I could save a fair amount of money every month using this pay-per-view model. Of course, the government will need to find some other way to get taxes on these purchase…

This morning, I was browsing through the headlines on Rueters.com. After reading about how Obama is all talk and no action and how Hillary is in the political fight of her life, I couldn’t help but read about the Tokyo marathon runner who solves the mystery of his chest pain: bleeding nipples and not a cardiovascular issue.

HUH?

Yes, bleeding nipples. This was a mystery? Apparently, he attributes it to chafing and not excessive titty twisters before the race.

What does this have to do with a better future? Well, one could argue that Brian Jones will certainly be a little perkier after his marathon, but the better future was part of a Rueter’s survey:

Growing confidence in the future and slightly warmer views of President George W. Bush and Congress put Americans in a better mood this month, according to a Reuters/Zogby poll released on Wednesday.

… Approval ratings for Bush climbed to 34 percent from 31 percent last month, and positive ratings for Congress inched up from 14 percent to a still-low 17 percent.

I’m feeling optimistic about the future. Bush signed a good stimulus package. More people are watching The Big Idea with Donny Deutsch. The Federal Reserve is finally waking up… Then another article catches my eye: LIBERAL INTOLERANCE:

The proportion of Americans reporting they feel less free to speak than they used to climbed from 13 percent in 1954 to 24 percent in 2005.

Guess they haven’t been reading many blogs lately. The first comment I received on my post about the ultra-boring two hour infomercial for Ford and Microsoft (aka Knight Rider) was the F-bomb. The only comment I received about the Bush Stimulus package being the next Big Idea was a tirade by a New Yorker that was longer than my post and didn’t address the point of my post.

Doesn’t seem like a lack of self expression is really present. I think the flaw with James L. Gibson’s study is how subjective it is to interpretation. For example:

The proportion who agree that “all people feel as free to say what they think as they used to” dropped from 56 percent to 43 percent.

Feeling “free to say what they think”? What exactly does that mean? Sounds like a personal problem.

After having slept through most of the 2 hour premiere of the new Knight Rider on NBC last night, I was about to say it would have one season of life. That was until I paid closer attention to the sponsors: Ford and Microsoft.

The new K.I.T is a Mustang. Depending upon what happens to sales of the mustang over the next television season, we can expect Knight Rider to be back because Ford will be willing to pay for the show.

Microsoft has considerable interest in NBC (MSNBC). Depending upon how well Ford vehicles with Microsoft’s Sync system sell, you can bet that Microsoft will be willing to help pay to keep the show on their television partner, NBC.

In much more simple terms: Knight Rider is an infomercial for Ford and Microsoft. I’ve tried this before on a much lower budget when I produced a television talk show starring Christine Eads. It is a brilliant idea if sales pan out for Ford and Microsoft.

Is Microsoft on the verge of creating the modern equivalent to Soap Operas? Will we call them Sync Operas? Stay tuned to NBC and Knight Rider to find out!

What would happen if everyone in America watches The Big Idea with Donny Deutsch on CNBC? First, there would be a run on the cable companies because you can only get CNBC on cable. Second, fellow blogger Tony Iovino would take his $600 check he’ll receive from the Federal government in May and actually cash it to invest it into a new invention (and he would start using the vastly superior WordPress blogging system). Third, the US economy would flourish.

Today, Bush signed his stimulus package, creating checks for millions of people in our economy. Lots of people love to complain about the symantics of the deal. Call it welfare. Call it a rebate. Call it what you want, it is our Federal government giving money to people that live in America.

Using some of the people I’ve seen on The Big Idea as an example, what those $600 checks have the potential to do is generate billions (yes, you read that correctly, BILLIONS) of dollars in revenue/income for Americans. How? Well, you should watch The Big Idea. The show has featured scores of people who have started their business for little more (sometimes even less) than $600. These people has created jobs, used resources that support other businesses, and made people a lot of money.

Sure, if everyone who receives a check goes a spends it on a toy at Walmart, it won’t do much for boosting the economy. However, let’s have a little fun with the math here. 130,000,000 Americans are going to receive a check. If even 0.1% of the people who receive checks become Donny Deutsch success stories, we are talking about generating $130,000,000,000 of revenue for the US economy over the next year! That’s correct, just one-tenth of one percent of the people who receive the checks need to become Donny Deutsch success stories for the checks to pay for themselves in just two year. One-tenth of one percent. That is about the same as a run-of-network banner advertisement on ValueClick!

Anyone who says the Bush stimulus package of a $600 tax rebate is not going to stimulate the US Economy hasn’t been watching The Big Idea with Donny Deutsch. I’ve seen more millionaires made from $600 or less on that show than I ever thought was possible. The moral of the story: Your wealth is what you make of it.

Every time I watch that show, I’m completely inspired. Regular people making it big because they had a dream that they pursued. My favorite episode was a few days ago. I can’t remember the guy’s name, but there was a venture capitalist on the show who said that the “side job” never becomes the next million dollar idea. Got me thinking about how many “side jobs” I’ve had over the years. None of them took off. Watching the show, I see nearly all of the stories have something in come: they quit their job went after the dream.

What dream is worth dreaming but not pursuing? Time to take the plunge. Grab that $600 tax rebate and do something with it!

Nearly a week into 2008, and I am long overdue for a post. What better way than to recap my favorites of 2007:

Favorite blog on my blogroll: 800lb Gorilla

Favorite color: Powder blue from the San Diego Charger jerseys

Favorite day: Day before my birthday (My brother and I ran the LA Triathlon Sprint)

Favorite city: Many to choose from, but gotta love Chicago (even during February)

Favorite SkyMall gadget: Gotta love the Gravity Defyer Shoes

Favorite conspiracy theory: Tom Cruise was cloned by Xenu and the clone is the crazy one we’ve seen in recent years

Favorite book: If I Did It. Just kidding. The Seven Lost Secrets of Success. Joe Vitale has mastered success and is passing it along. That’s the way it should be!

Favorite moment at work: There are so many to choose from. While the Montel Williams show was interesting and The Talking Show was a first, neither of them is the top choice. Not quite the top either, the GBK Oscars Gift Suite was certainly enjoyable, as was the Scriptwriter’s Showcase. I even learned about how bad the strike would be months before it happened. Even though having Reggie Bush on the cover of the magazine was nice, that too was not my favorite moment. My favorite moment at work definitely has to be when I realized I had a great advertisement.

Favorite dance event: 2007 US Open. The Moorpark College Swing Dance Team received second place in their very first team competition at the US Open. I was one of the founding members of the college club at Moorpark, so it was particularly enjoyable to see them do so well in their first competition.

Favorite radio moment: When I was doing the Gadget Panel Radio show while on the road, heading to a Dodgers game. My phone cut out and Gadget Panelist Vadim was unable to get himself on the phone circuit. Great radio!

Favorite blog I didn’t write: The blog recapping my trip to New Zealand with the 20GB of pictures and photos I took while down under.

Favorite Movie: Ratatouille. The little ones teach us so much in life.

Favorite Website: Ext JS. The web’s future is so bright it’s gotta wear shades. My favorite demo is the desktop sample.  My nerd side is shining.