animals, cool stuff, culture, Environment, life, photos, predictions, technology, thoughts, travel, Traveling

How Tesla has changed my life & could transform society

A little over a year ago, I purchased an entry-level Tesla Model S75 after my Chevy Volt was totaled in a car accident. The alternatives to the Model S that I considered at the time were another Chevy Volt or the Chevy Bolt. But after a test drive in a Model S, it was love at first drive.

To skip the long post with photos and get to how Tesla will change our lives, click here.

To be fair, the Chevy Volt and Bolt are both excellent cars for what they are. They cost considerably less than the Model S but also lack major features such as supercharging, over-the-air software updates, and autopilot. The Model S is considerably more comfortable than both Chevy models.

Fast forward to August 27, 2018, and I start a road trip with my wife and our dog that will give me a glimpse of just how much Tesla could end up altering the physical and social landscape of the world. Our road trip is from Southern California (just north of Los Angeles) to Peoria, Illinois to visit my wife’s grandma who has stage 5 Parkinson’s and back to California via Flagstaff, Arizona to visit my wife’s cousin.

We used EVTripPlanner.com to map out the expected supercharger locations ahead of the trip but used Tesla’s navigation suggestions for the supercharger stops during actual execution of the road trip. The original plan was to take a leisurely stroll to get there and to get back. We planned for just over two weeks of total trip time with about 5 days with Grandma in Peoria.

Our first overnight stay was in Las Vegas. Getting there was pretty simple. We stopped in Barstow, CA to supercharge even though Tesla’s navigation had us going to the Yermo station. We really stopped in Barstow for the Del Taco! It’s one of the few that’s owned by the original owner of Del Taco and has the most superb carnitas burritos. It’s just down the street from the charging station in Barstow.

IMG_0143[1]

We decided to stop in Primm, NV for our next stop. Since we already knew we were stopping in Primm, we charged less than we’d normally charge in Barstow.

Primm has become our customary stop for us on our way to Vegas anyway. We stop and play the first slot machine that’s calling our name since it’s the first city on the California/Nevada border. It’s an even better stop now that we have a Tesla! We take our dog (who is named Tesla) for a potty break while the car is charging and then took turns with our own potty breaks and slot machine play. Meanwhile, our car is almost fully charged while we’re doing what needs to be done anyway.

IMG_0157[1]

We’re back on the road and at our hotel in Vegas. It’s the same hotel we stayed at when we got married, so it carries particular sentimental value for us. In retrospect, we wouldn’t stop in Vegas on this road trip again unless we really wanted to stay in Vegas for a night. It’s not very far along for a road trip this long, but it worked great for this first time Tesla road trip!

We got a late start to the second day or our trip, but fortunately our next stop was well within the range we had left, so we didn’t have to charge in Vegas at all.

The drive between Vegas and St. George, UT takes you through The Virgin River Gorge. It was one of the most beautiful parts of this road trip! The video I linked to is not a video I took, but it’s a great representation of that beautiful drive.

St. George’s supercharger station happened to be right next to an excellent breakfast restaurant. We had a nice brunch with Tesla (the dog) sitting just on the other side of the outdoor patio. By the time we were done, our car was fully charged; just like our bellies!

Beaver was our next supercharger stop. There wasn’t much there, but Tesla enjoyed the Dairy Queen!

IMG_0287

Green River, UT was our next planned stop, but the scenery along the way had us stop for a phenomenal pano.IMG_0290.JPG

Green River was an interesting stop. The museum where the superchargers are located was closed by the time we got there, but at least the giant watermelon was still there for a photo-op!

IMG_0313.JPG

It was off to Grand Junction, CO, for our final stop on day two. Our leisurely stroll through the Rocky Mountains was well underway, and Tesla (the dog) was really enjoying all the different sites (or smells) as much as we were!

Day three took us to Glenwood Springs, CO, for our first stop. We were already in awe of the beautiful scenery along the Colorado River, and we had eyeballed a few access roads that were even closer to the river. As beautiful as everything was along the way, nothing could really prepare us for the love-at-first-sight feeling we had in Glenwood Springs.

IMG_0341

While taking Tesla for a walk during the supercharger/bathroom break, I happened upon a beautiful flowering plant that was abuzz with honey bees!

IMG_0350

It was almost like a scene from a movie… I was focused on the bees flying around, doing their duties when along came a gust of wind. When I looked behind me, I saw a flier for the Iron Mountain Hot Springs. This couldn’t be coincidence. It’s obviously an act from above that has brought this tattered old flier to my feet!

My wife and I got back in the car once it was ready to continue the trip. One of the nicest things about Tesla’s navigation (and mobile app) is that you receive a notification when your car is charged enough to continue along your route. As we drove off, I showed my wife the flier for the Hot Springs. The navigation ended up taking us through Glenwood Springs on the way back to the freeway. I felt a sense of deja vu as we drove through the little town. The ye olde buildings and main drag had us contemplating a road trip just to Glenwood Springs in the near future.

Before we were even back on the highway, my wife had pulled up all sorts of information about Glenwood Spring. We’d both spend the next 72 hours pining over this quaint little town in the middle of Colorado and figuring out if we can make it from our home to Glenwood Spring in a single day. Turns out there’s an adventure park there, great hiking trails, and caverns! And, yes, it’s only 17.5 hours of drive + charge time from our house!

After Glenwood Springs, we kept on our trek up the Rockies, through Vail, Silverthorne (great supercharger stop), and even stopped for a scenic view of a historic railroad.

IMG_0412

By nightfall we were in Denver, and a friend of mine I hadn’t seen in years (and who made my wife’s engagement ring) happened to be available for dinner. We enjoyed some great sushi in a small town called Parker, just outside of Denver. After dinner, my wife and I had a quick conversation that would end up changing our lives forever.

With the urgency of Grandma’s health in the background, I asked my wife, “What do you think about driving all the way through to Peoria from here?”

Autopilot had been doing the vast majority of the driving for us so far. Supercharger stops and having our dog with us also meant that we needed to stop at regular intervals that made a long haul pretty easy on the butt and back. Unlike stopping for gas and rushing off, we had to stretch our legs and let Tesla (the dog) pee while Tesla (the car) charged. It’s a match made in heaven for comfortable long haul driving; at least that was our thinking.

Turns out we were right!

We stopped at the prescribed supercharger stations in Nebraska (what a LONG state!) in Iowa. A 30-60 minute charge for the car allowed enough time for me to recharge my brain and rest my eyes enough to keep focused. Of course, Autopilot is what really made the biggest difference. Autopilot significantly reduces the fatigue of driving a long haul. There just isn’t as much tugging on the steering wheel. It really adds up over a long drive like this. While I was driving, my wife rested so that she could take on the second half of the 900+ mile stretch between Denver and Peoria.

By the time we were finished with Nebraska, I was finished with driving. My wife took over for the remainder of the stretch until we stopped at the last supercharger until Peoria, where I took over again. When all was said and done, our non-stop driving took us from Grand Junction, CO to Peoria, IL (nearly 1200 miles) over the course of a day-and-a-half! We were all exhausted, even Tesla (the dog).

IMG_0470

Still… that was nothing compared to our road trip back!

Because we came in a day early, we decided we could leave a day later too. Thanks to Tesla Autopilot and supercharging, we were able to get two more precious days with Grandma!

On September 8, we mapped out our trip to Flagstaff. We’d head straight to Albuquerque, NM. Just supercharging and meal breaks. We left just before sundown and quickly realized that wasn’t the best idea. Missouri rain drops the size of golf balls were in our future. How would Autopilot handle it? Perfectly!

The only spot where Autopilot had difficulty in the rain was on a stretch of the I40 where they had paved the road and hadn’t put down proper markers. In fairness to Tesla, I could barely figure out where I was supposed to be on the road and everyone was driving under 50 mph the whole time.

The true reason we were bummed about going through Missouri at night was that we ended up missing out on the fudge factory in Uranus. The roadside billboards gave us a good chuckle driving through: The Best Fudge Comes from Uranus

Having learned a bit from the drive out, we started checking to see what was within walking distance near each of the supercharger stations. We ended up adjusting our stops because the Springfield, MO supercharger had a Waffle House right there. Other stops had Waffle Houses close (it’s Missouri, after all), but the Springfield supercharger was the perfect opportunity to take a longer stop and enjoy some Waffle House!

We ended up stopping at the Joplin, MO, supercharger because the mapping software was telling us we needed to stop there in order to make it to Tulsa. This was definitely one of those moments that wouldn’t really happen in a 90 or 100 Tesla or even a Model 3. The stop in Joplin was very quick though. Tesla maps had us out of there in about 15 minutes.

We should have spent that 15 minutes a little more wisely because we would have noticed that the Tulsa, OK supercharger was in the parking lot for the Hard Rock casino. It was a fun use of a $20 bill until we realized that there were cash only toll roads along the way.

Our settings for navigation had us avoiding toll roads, so the directions on the map looked a bit odd. Once we realized that the tolls trimmed more than an hour off our drive time, we found all the quarters in my wife’s purse and took the toll roads! It’s definitely worth it to take the toll rather than the dark back roads.

By daytime, we were in Texas. Shamrock, TX gave us our first glimpse of the old Route 66 and what was the old school equivalent to superchargers back in the 1930s.IMG_0623

On the way out of Texas, we stopped at the Amarillo supercharger. Driving through Amarillo gave me a craving for some steak! There wasn’t anything right near the supercharger, but you could smell the steak. I started plotting a road trip just to Amarillo while chatting it up with a fellow Tesla driver who was also charging.

Next thing you know, we’re in New Mexico and getting closer and closer to Albuquerque. Then the real rain hit! I thought the golf ball rain drops in Missouri were something… A monsoon was blowing through Albuquerque, and it was a site. Lightening and thunder! Tesla (the dog) wasn’t a big fan of either, but Autopilot handled the torrential rainfall like a champ. We checked into our hotel and relaxed for the rest of the day. Just over 1200 miles in under 24 hours!

We were all a little slow getting up the next morning…

IMG_0659.JPG

We hit the road and noticed a freeway with the same number as the freeway closest to us in California: 118. We decided to take an exit to go along the 118 and soon discovered that we were likely along the path that inspired the Disney “Cars” franchise.

IMG_0668

Wasn’t long before we were in Flagstaff! Just one supercharger stop in Holbrook (along with a cheeseburger). Otherwise, we were just like the Nat King Cole song!

The biggest surprise of the trip took place on the way to Flagstaff. While cruising along I40 on Autopilot, my Model S pulled suddenly to the right and slowed down. There didn’t seem to be any reason for Autopilot to do this. The road was clear ahead. I grabbed the wheel, thinking perhaps there was a glitch. Autopilot disengaged, and that’s when I noticed what the issue was. There was a car in the passing lane that had been driving in my blind spot that moved into my lane. Autopilot navigated away from that car and likely avoided a 75 mph sideswipe! The driver of the other vehicle kept swerving in and out of the two lanes until the next exit. We were feeling extremely thankful for Autopilot before, now it was a lifesaver!

We shacked up with my wife’s cousin in Flagstaff, called Grandma to let her know we made it safe, and spent the rest of the day enjoying family time. Thanks to Autopilot, we again were able to arrive without being as exhausted and stayed up late with full bellies from a great family dinner.

As we were going to bed, we got the call about Grandma. As sad as it was that she was gone, my wife and I were so grateful for the extra two days we had with Grandma because Tesla Autopilot made it so much easier to drive for longer distances. We felt so fortunate to not stay in Denver overnight on the way out and leave for the road trip back a day later.

The next day was an easy trip home from Flagstaff back to Simi Valley, CA. We did the same Barstow Del Taco stop and even shared part of a burrito with Tesla (the dog). By the time we made it home, we logged 4,544.5 miles for the whole trip with 2,182.1 for the trip back home. I calculated out the mpg equivalent to the kWh we consumed on the trip, and it comes out to be about 129MPG!

IMG_0729

The Summary

Convenience is a relative term. Is it possible to drive 4500 miles in an ICE faster than we manged to do it in a Tesla Model S75? Most certainly, but that wasn’t our goal. Our trip was surprisingly comfortable. Most of the legs of our trip were 1.5 – 2 hours with 30 – 45 minute supercharger stops in between. This ended up being the perfect timing for our legs, back, butts, dog, and bladders.

Visiting my wife’s family in Illinois and Arizona more often will bring our family closer and create greater bonds between everyone. These trips are obviously possible using an ICE, but they are far more comfortable and healthier for us because we are doing them in a Tesla with Autopilot. You can’t really put a price tag on family, so what Tesla has provided for us is worth far more than the cost of the Model S. It’s also something that’s just not possible in any other EV on the market.

Getting out of the car every 1-2 hours for a good 15-30 minute stretch slows down your travel but ensures a better rested body. On several of the stops, my wife and I would even get in a good 20 minute meditation. The benefit of avoiding physical and mental fatigue coupled with the assistance of Autopilot made for an enjoyable 4500 mile road trip that we’re now planning on making 3-4x per year.

How Tesla Will Change Our Social & Physical Landscapes

Tesla’s vehicles and infrastructure make it easier to be closer to your family when there are longer distances between you. It’s not about a fast road trip. It’s about the quality/comfort of the time on that road trip and how you feel when you arrive. With Autopilot and superchargers, you arrive well rested. The drive is considerably more comfortable and less stressful thanks to Autopilot and the required, prolonged supercharger stops.

Locations with superchargers that provide amenities are desirable, and I think that eventually superchargers will be operated by companies other than Tesla. As other EV makers produce cars worthy of road trips, 3rd party supercharging equivalent stations will become an enticement to road trippers. Towns with supercharger spots (like Glenwood Springs) will have a wider tourist draw than towns without the charging infrastructure.

The day will come when you go to sleep by yourself in a car and wake up, well rested, at your destination, 3K miles away. The car will stop at the necessary charge stations and recharge all on its own and then head back down the highway. Flying will still be the quickest way to travel from NY to LA, but Tesla will change that for many other common long distance adventures.

Flying from LA to Vegas used to be something I preferred over driving. Now, I’d prefer to drive from LA to Vegas in a Tesla. I get some great carnitas burritos and my total driving time in only one hour longer than it is to fly when you factor in drive time to the airport, TSA lines, and getting a cab to the strip/hotel.

Then there’s the flexibility in time. Catching a flight from LAX to Aspen (closest airport to Glenwood Springs, CO) is a one hour drive to LAX + one hour arrival time window + two-hour flight to Aspen + one hour drive + whatever time on the tarmac (usually at least 30+ minutes). That 5.5 hours is considerably shorter than the estimated 17 hours of Tesla driving. 12 hours of time is a whole day at the caverns, adventure park, and hot springs. So, you can’t beat that… other than there being only a single non-stop flight between LAX and Aspen per day and flights with layovers can end up being longer than 15 hours in flight time.

It’s also nearly $400/ticket to get to Aspen on that non-stop flight. Tesla supercharging (which is included with my Tesla Model S but can run upwards of $0.26/kWh) would be approximately $81.02 for as many people as you can fit into a Model S (five adults, comfortably). Even with just two people, the $ cost savings is notable. Throw in the scenic drive and those Barstow Del Taco carnitas burritos…

Tesla road trips will increase regional tourism. Plenty of couples/families like mine will enjoy slightly longer road trips because they are now more comfortable and easier to accomplish thanks to Autopilot and superchargers! Families will be brought closer, and communities will prosper from friendly road trip tourism. My wife & I already have several trips planned for a variety of adventures, and based upon the wonderful Tesla drivers we met along the way, we’re not the only ones!

Advertisements
Business, Economics, Environment, inspiration, technology, thoughts, Traveling

National Park Cryptocurrencies and Cryptocurrencies for Everyone

Four years ago, I wrote about how the national parks can avoid the next government shutdown. It was a bit shortsighted in retrospect. Rather than utilizing bonds, national parks (any any organization for that matter) should leverage cryptocurrencies. There are over 1,000 cryptocurrencies in existence today (most should be avoided).  But a park like Yosemite Nation Park fits the mold of being a perfect fit for a cryptocurrency.

A Yosemitecoin has a specific use for a specific purpose. Want to visit and park at Yosemite? Pay in Yosemitecoin. Want to stay at a lodge in Yosemite? Pay in Yosemitecoin. It’s important to the ecological health of Yosemite to limit the number of visitors per season/year, so having a cryptocurrency that is limited in availability during a season would allow the price/cost of Yosemitecoin to limit the exposure of the park.

Mining of Yosemitecoin could prove to be a profitable venture for miners depending upon how the rules are setup for Yosemitecoin mining and exchanging. Exchanging could help boost the overall budget available for Yosemite National Park and allow for the park to afford more resources to ensure the park is well maintained and employees at the park are well compensated. A Yosemitecoin could even serve as a long-term retirement investment vehicle for park employees.

Getting into details for all of this would require much more than a simple blog post. However, every national park, non-profits, and global organizations (such as the red cross) could greatly benefit from having their own cryptocurrency that furthers their cause.

blogging, Economics, Environment

Resolving the Externalities of Internal Combustion Engine Usage or the answer to Electric Car Tax Incentives

Anyone following the rise of electric car transportation has often heard gripes from anti-EV folks about a “dirty grid”, “subsidies”, or even how EVs allegedly produce more pollution during their manufacturing than what is produced for the entire life of an internal combustion engine. Wired magazine even go into the mix with their (bunk) article talking about how EVs aren’t as green as you think they are. I’m not going to link to any of these “articles” because they are, quite frankly, gibberish. They often make claims such as lithium being a rare earth material (it’s not) or that Tesla uses permanent magnets in their motors (they’re AC induction, so they don’t; and Tesla gets all of it’s cobalt in North America).

Instead, I’m going to link to articles that provide insight into an often overlooked topic of internal combustion engines (ICE): externality economic benefits afforded to ICE manufacturers. As is turns out, driving in rush hour traffic is potentially twice as hazardous to your health than currently believed. This externality benefit is afforded to car manufacturers who are making ICE. They incur relatively zero cost for developing a product that produces emissions that the manufacturer has zero responsibility for. This is a tremendous economic benefit afforded to ICE manufacturers. While they are responsible for containing the pollution produced during the manufacturing of their product, they have zero responsibility for the pollution created during the usage of their production AND there is no way to use their product without producing pollution (unless you put the car in a museum).

One might argue that the driver should be responsible for that pollution or that the driver is responsible for the pollution because of paying taxes on gas. Let’s not pretend that the taxes on gasoline are even used for their intended purpose of rebuilding roads let alone healthcare costs incurred from the pollution caused by refining and burning gasoline. Also, the manufacturers of ICE don’t provide (or even have) the ability to collect pollution, so we’re stuck with tailpipe emissions spread to someone else’s property and effecting their lives. These effects are very costly, and the burden (as detailed in the RAND report I’ve linked to) is on health insurance companies, or government, and individuals deprived of their health liberty due to no action of their own! Certainly, one’s own rush hour car pollution is enough to kill them dozens of times over, but I digress… Perhaps the health insurance companies could lobby to get their money back?

The solution is fairly simple. Place a health insurance tax on the manufacturer of ICE vehicles that cannot be passed along to the consumer unless that consumer is a government agency. This tax would be paid to companies and individuals paying for health insurance to help offset their increased medical costs due to the products developed and sold by ICE manufacturers. The tax would be based upon the pollution (we’re not just talking about CO2 but ALL air pollution) produced by a vehicle from driving it 10K miles per year with the average life being 10 years for the vehicle and adjusted annually for the increased pollution that an ICE produces as it ages (which is the opposite of what happens with EV since grids are becoming cleaner each year).

The results from this would be reduced out of pocket medical costs for individuals since they are no longer subsidizing ICE manufacturers, a likely bankrupt automobile industry as electric cars would suddenly become significantly less expensive than ICE, and we can finally get rid of those tax incentives for electric vehicles that anti-EV folks love to complain about! Joking aside, there are considerable health costs that ICE manufacturers are causing by continuing to manufacture products that have no method to avoid. Taxing the manufacturers for their externality benefit they receive at our expense is a potential way to provide those manufacturers with incentives to make better products that are less detrimental to our health and puts the financial burden on the industry directly responsible for substantial increase in healthcare costs over the last half century.

Environment, life, Stuff that sucks, travel, Traveling

Quitting Smoking Can Be Hazardous to Your Health

We all know that smoking is linked to a myriad of diseases. We see all the campaigns about the dangers of smoking. I have encouraged people to stop smoking. I’ve evern purchased the gum and patches for an girlfriend I was dating years ago who was having difficulty quitting.

I never thought I would meet someone who almost died from quitting smoking. Technically, I didn’t meet him, but I did meet his daughter. A couple of Fridays ago (Friday the 13th to be precise) I was heading back to LAX on my second redeye of the day. I got to talking with the lady sitting next to me about things, and we got onto the topic of her dad. Her story was one of the ironic stories I’ve ever heard.

Her dad had been smoking for decades. For years, everyone had been telling him to quit smoking. He smoked a couple of cigarettes on his way to work and on his way back home. He also smoked during the day, but most of his smoking was in his truck because it was a long commute and stressed him out. One day, he decided that it would be best for him to quit so that he cold live a longer, more fulfilling life. He worked hard to resist the urge to smoke while driving.

After a few months, he ended up in the hospital with severe headaches and an increasing loss of mental capacity. He was diagnosed with brain damage. It turned out that his truck had a cabin leak that was pumping carbon minoxide into the cabin. While he was smoking, he always had the windows down to let the cigarette smoke out. After he quit smoking, he kept the windows rolled up.

There is one upside to this story. It generated awareness in his neighborhood about the dangers of carbon minoxide poisoning in their cars and homes.

Business, Economics, Education, Environment, life, News, philosophy, predictions, rants, School, Stuff that sucks, technology, thoughts

I Can’t Say I Don’t Like to Say I Told You So

Today gives me yet another day to gloat about the idiotic college professor I had years ago at Strayer University (yes, avoid this college. It is a waste of time and money). The CEO of Dow Chemical borrowed a page straight out of my economic philosophy and is proving that energy based inflation is a reality, not some idea that deserves a B on my term paper. Dow is going to raise their prices immediately by up to 20%

Dow is just the start too. Energy based inflation starts here. Energy prices increase, putting pressure on businesses to either cut profits or slow down. Traditional economist, aka most college professors, will tell you that energy prices will come back down and everyone will be happy. However, in the real world this doesn’t and didn’t happen over the last 10 years. The result is that every company in America (except big energy, and miraculously Walmart) is being squeezed to the brink of no ability to make a profit or even be productive at any level.

There is a solution. It isn’t cheap, but it wouldn’t cost any more than the failed tax rebate of 2008. This solution would provide a long-term solution to the energy crisis in America and heavily stimulate the US economy while building the infrastructure needed.

Where have all those “tax rebates” gone? Hats off to anyone who spends it on anything other than energy.

Economics, Education, Environment, News, Politics, predictions, rants, School, Stuff that sucks, thoughts

Leave the Economy to the Other Idiots

Not long ago, I wrote a blog about the most idiotic economic political scam of the 2008 election year. Today, I read to stories about our economy that rank up there with the “gas tax vacation”.

The first story was about how the Fed has adjusted it’s estimates for 2008:

  • Economic growth of 0.3 – 1.2%, instead of 1.3 – 2%
  • Unemployment rate 5.5 – 5.7%, instead of 5.2 – 5.5%

Good thing they are still running those antiquated economic formulas to give us these otherwise worthless numbers. An added bonus is that the Fed also adjusted their inflation estimate upwards.

There really should be no surprise here folks. Bernanke just needs to start reading my blog to get better guidance on economic policy. I’ve written about energy-based inflation before. Of course, I even wrote about it years before that in a paper for an upper division economics course I was taking in college. The professor said it was an unrealistic theory.

Why I keep talking about this college professor is because that is what economists are learning in college (not all colleges, of course). Our economists are morons because they were trained to be morons!

Meanwhile, back in the world of ridiculous economic news for May 21, 2008… The other bit of economic news that really got me chuckling today was the news about the oil executives going before Congress again. How many times are we going to have to watch the same FAKE political interrogation? This is a political SCAM. The oil companies are pulling an Enron. Only, the goal is not to get California to sign a ridiculous long-term energy contract… The goal is to get the United States to open land restrictions in Alaska, the Rocky Mountains, and/or the Pacific Ocean so the oil companies can go drilling for oil. Enron is small potatoes compared to this scam.

Environment, movies, rants, Stuff that sucks, technology, thoughts

Environmental Naivety. Who Really Killed the Electric Bus?

I think it’s ironic that anyone who is an environmentalist will purchase a DVD called “Who Killed the Electric Car?” This movie slams GM for playing a major part in killing the large inadequate technology of electric vehicles. Of course, this film is a Sony Pictures Classics Film, but they make no mention about the vested interest that Sony has in DVDs. I’m sure “Electric Car” will be on Blu-ray soon.

The best part is DVDs are made primarily from crude oil based substances. Why wasn’t this distributed via free download over the Internet instead? This isn’t about protecting the environment. This is people trying to make a fast buck on environmental naivety.

Learn who really killed the electric bus!