Posts Tagged ‘energy-based inflation’

Today gives me yet another day to gloat about the idiotic college professor I had years ago at Strayer University (yes, avoid this college. It is a waste of time and money). The CEO of Dow Chemical borrowed a page straight out of my economic philosophy and is proving that energy based inflation is a reality, not some idea that deserves a B on my term paper. Dow is going to raise their prices immediately by up to 20%

If you’re asking “Who the hell is Dow? Isn’t that a stock exchange?” Check the back of half the cleaning supplies you have in your house and ask just about every company in America where they receive a good portion of their supplies from! They don’t just make scrubbing bubbles America!

Dow is just the start too. Energy based inflation starts here. Energy prices increase, putting pressure on businesses to either cut profits or slow down. Traditional economist, aka most college professors, will tell you that energy prices will come back down and everyone will be happy. However, in the real world this doesn’t and didn’t happen over the last 10 years. The result is that every company in America (except big energy, and miraculously Walmart) is being squeezed to the brink of no ability to make a profit or even be productive at any level.

There is a solution. It isn’t cheap, but it wouldn’t cost any more than the failed tax rebate of 2008. This solution would provide a long-term solution to the energy crisis in America and heavily stimulate the US economy while building the infrastructure needed.

Where have all those “tax rebates” gone? Hats off to anyone who spends it on anything other than energy.

Not long ago, I wrote a blog about the most idiotic economic political scam of the 2008 election year. Today, I read to stories about our economy that rank up there with the “gas tax vacation”.

The first story was about how the Fed has adjusted it’s estimates for 2008:

  • Economic growth of 0.3 – 1.2%, instead of 1.3 – 2%
  • Unemployment rate 5.5 – 5.7%, instead of 5.2 – 5.5%

Good thing they are still running those antiquated economic formulas to give us these otherwise worthless numbers. An added bonus is that the Fed also adjusted their inflation estimate upwards.

There really should be no surprise here folks. Bernanke just needs to start reading my blog to get better guidance on economic policy. I’ve written about energy-based inflation before. Of course, I even wrote about it years before that in a paper for an upper division economics course I was taking in college. The professor said it was an unrealistic theory.

Why I keep talking about this college professor is because that is what economists are learning in college (not all colleges, of course). Our economists are morons because they were trained to be morons!

Meanwhile, back in the world of ridiculous economic news for May 21, 2008… The other bit of economic news that really got me chuckling today was the news about the oil executives going before Congress again. How many times are we going to have to watch the same FAKE political interrogation? This is a political SCAM. The oil companies are pulling an Enron. Only, the goal is not to get California to sign a ridiculous long-term energy contract… The goal is to get the United States to open land restrictions in Alaska, the Rocky Mountains, and/or the Pacific Ocean so the oil companies can go drilling for oil. Enron is small potatoes compared to this scam.

Economists have fascinated me for decades, so much so that I actually when to school for a degree in economics. After years of bogus economic theory after bogus economic theory, I was still in the game. That’s until I predicted that a steady increase in the cost of energy would send the US Economy into an unprecedented type of economic turmoil. I called it Energy Based Inflation in my paper, and subsequently received my first B on a term paper in college.

I even came up with a solution to Energy Based Inflation. Yet, to date, I still see economists following the same failed economic concepts being taught while I was going to school.

Yahoo published an Associated Press article about recent slashing of jobs. The article indicated that a growing number of economists were starting to believe that we were in a recession.

Here is a bit of news to economists: We’ve been in a recession since at least 4th quarter of 2007. The collapse of the financial market is due to the fact that we financed the recession via our properties, equity, and homes. The Federal Reserve resisted the idea of being in a recession during 2007, and took no action to curb the debt spending taking place. By the 4th quarter, there was no longer any equity in our property and the market began collapsing.

At this point, there is very little that the Fed or the Whitehouse can do to turn this situation around quickly. Prices on homes have plunged so much that it has exacerbated the debt situation. Lowering interest rates won’t provide an immediate relief because the prices are too low. It will act more as a tourniquet against the virtual free fall of property value.

If we can fix our economic education system, we can fix the problem long-term. Until we stop teaching the antiquated and failed economic theory of the last 30 years, we’ll repeat the same mistakes.

Complex problems require simple solutions!

Many point to alternative energy sources as a way to combat rising energy prices. While this will help get us half way there, it won’t solve the problem quickly. To find the solution to the American energy crisis, we need to borrow a page from one of our Founding Father and the creator of what is considered today the Republican Party. Yes, a Republican!

Borrowing ideas from one of our greatest Founding Fathers, Alexander Hamilton, I’ve devised a long-term plan that would stimulate our economy in the short-term and end our reliance on any foreign energy resources. The best part is that just about any government in the world could implement a similar plan, giving us something else to fight about 😛

If you are feeling dangerous, you can read my idea on my new website WordsCause.com. And don’t forget to checkout the weekly WordsCause radio show hosted by yours truly and my great friend Dean this Saturday at 10AM!

Just last week, I has started publishing information about energy-based inflation. I had the idea and predicted it in a paper I wrote for an economics class almost 5 years ago. It was the first, and only, B graded paper I had ever written in an economics class. The professor gave it this low grade because he ultimately disagreed with me that energy could cause a ripple of inflation in the American economy.

This morning, I check my email to find further support for my theory of energy-based inflation. The Washington Post published an article about how Coal Can’t Fill the World’s Burning Appetite. To sum up their article, circumstances have shot the price of coal up by 50% or more over the last five month. While this short-term spurt in price may be able to be absorbed by businesses, don’t count on it. The price of coal is not going to be coming down any time soon. Same with oil.

What does this mean for America? Well, if you read the report from our government, guess where we get 49% of our energy from? If there is a sustained increase in the price of the resource that generates 49% of all of our energy, you can bet your house that prices are going to go up everywhere!

The bottom line is that energy is driving inflation in our economy, not interest rates. Watch what happens to all the rate cuts by the Federal Reserve this year. They will go to offset the energy costs. It will temporarily stabilize energy inflation, but it is not a permanent solution. Energy costs will rise, and the Fed will be powerless. Changes in the energy market are the only thing that will curb energy-based inflation. I’ll post my solution on Wordscause this evening.

I majored in economics because I thought it was a fascinating subject. Years ago (circa 2003) I was taking an economics class at Strayer University and handed in a paper explaining that our economy was seriously threatened by energy-based inflation. Up until this point in my education, I had received an A on every test and every paper, but this paper on energy-based inflation would the first B grade I received on any economic paper. The professor even mentioned that he was going to give me a C but that I had worded my argument so well that I deserved a B.

His argument was that energy prices generally remain stable and that companies will compensate for any prolonged increase in energy prices. Failing to see the long-term trend towards higher energy consumption was my professor’s largest mistake in the analysis of my paper. He also failed to understand the world demand on supplies of energy. So, alas, I get to say I told you so! 😀

I’ve written a brief explanation of energy-based inflation on Words Cause. The idea is pretty simple. Energy is required at every stage of a product or service, which means that a sustained and rapid increase in the price of energy would severely damage the US economy. Over the last several years, my theory has essentially proven itself to be
correct. Energy prices continue to rise, causing inflationary pressures that the Federal Reserve is powerless to affect.

I’ll digress for a moment to cover the trash talking that politicians like Ron Paul have been spewing forth about the Federal Reserve. Ron Paul has no understanding of monetary policy and is exactly the political reason that the Federal Reserve is in place. Monetary policy should not be governed by the winds of politics.

Meanwhile, back to energy-based inflation… The Federal Reserve can’t do anything about energy-based inflation. Contracting the money supply will only choke the economy (which is what we’ve seen over the last 2 years since Bernanke has been Fed Chairman). Increasing the money supply will quickly be absorbed by a rapid increase in the price of energy (resulting in ripple inflation). Watch what happens with the recent decrease in interest rates.

So what would be the solution? I’ll outline my solution later this week on Words Cause.