Archive for the ‘Television’ Category

Over the last 20 years I have been involved with advertising technology, copy writing, marketing, direct marketing, and just about every form of advertising that exists in America. I love advertising. I have a special place in my heart (and my wallet) for advertising and marketing. The creative aspects of advertising can be nothing short of brilliant; as is the case with the mathematics used in formulating and measuring marketing campaigns!

Historically (meaning: radio, print, TV) , you needed to justify advertising rates with circulation, readers, subscribers, etc. Nielsen built their entire business on providing TV/radio/internet publishers what was available in “old media”. Advertising with publishers was simple: if you wanted to reach an audience of 6MM parents and have the budget, you could find the right publications, shows, etc. and even narrow your market based upon the demographic overlay of the publishers’ audience. In other words, you want to sell baby clothes to parent… you advertise in Parents magazine, not Wild West Magazine. You’d do the opposite for your limited edition collectors coin.

Social Media ushered in a promise of having near real-time and (supposedly) far more accurate statistics. Suddenly, we weren’t talking about difficult to quantify metrics like “circulation” and “page views”. Social Media brought us the “follower” and “like” metrics (likes, reactions, upvotes, etc), which are the ultimate… They are the Jesus metric and ostensibly engagement.

Of course, bots are an issue, but there’s a larger issue with Social Media metrics: the value that followers and likes are afforded. Standard web metrics like page views/session and time on a page are the gold standard for content engagement, and followers + likes are supposed to provide the same for Social Media. Yet, followers and and likes have a serious shortcoming. I’ll get to that in a bit but first…

There are really only two true “value” measurements in modern technology: human time and processor power+time (which is easy to measure in electricity). Followers and likes doesn’t measure either of those as the human time it takes to follow is nominal as is the computer time). Not to mention the intent of a follower (e.g. Judas followers & Judas sharing). This is further exacerbated by the fact that most Social Media is “free”. Obviously, Social Media is not free. The cost is your data, the rights to your content, and being subjected to the network bubble that ensues. But I digress…

Following a profile on Social Media costs very little human or computer time. Same with likes/reactions. In fact, keeping up with those profiles requires very little human or computer time AND technology is making that time less and less with automation and AI. In other words, Social Media metrics of followers and likes have virtually no economic value (human + computer time). Even comments are questionable. (consider the @username comments that are prevalent in Social Media). Throw in the fact that followers and likes can be purchased through advertising and followers/likes can carry a negative economic value to the brand.

Yet, Social Media monetary value is measured in followers. “Influencers” are those with a greater number of followers and reactions on their media. Throw in bots and the fact that all Social Media algorithms formulate a bubble and it’s not difficult to figure out how to game the social media systems.

Social Media made formulas for determining relevance that is calculated based upon self referencing metrics that are easily gamed and also have little to no economic value. Social Media formulas are not based upon relevance derived by a premium on top of human and computer time.

Enter Social Media powered by tokenizing (e.g blockchain mining). Social Media no longer needs to be powered by advertising (although advertising does not go away). Users mine on their network(s) of choice and use their earnings to perform network interactions. Users are directly investing their computer time into their social network(s), even without consuming content or using the network.

Placing content on the network(s) requires exchanging/purchasing the content space on the network. Which is somewhat counter to social networks today that are paying content creators for their content via advertising.

So, why would anyone want this tokenized model when everything under today’s model is “free”?

  • Consuming content would also require an exchange/purchase, and content creators can place a premium on interacting with their content
  • Advertising/product placement would still exist and content creators have more powerful metrics (e.g. on average, I receive 500,000 tokens for every piece of content I produce) to provide advertisers such that the content creators can charge more
  • Content creators have the ability to set their own rates of consumption as well as the license of their content (permanent, time limitation, etc)
  • Helpers (think stackoverflow.com) would be able to determine if someone asking a question is paying a viable rate for them to provide their insight for tips. For example, User A tips well for the winning answer to a complex coding issue. Helper 1 sees that and is willing to provide more comprehensive advise than RTFM and is rewarded handsomely by User A for the sound advice
  • Advertising on the social networks would have smart contracts that could come with clauses making bot interactions and/or nefarious interactions much easier to punish
  • The social networks have control over all the tokens and can easily reverse/punish bot transactions, virtually eliminating the problem of bots. In other words, if a bot farm wants to provide mining for the social network so that the bot farm can produce and interact with content on a massive scale such that it would influence people, it will cost the bot farm considerably more computer time than it does now. Also, once the bot farm is determined to be a bot farm by the social network, the bot farm tokens can be confiscated by the social network and the bot farm content revoked. The bot farm loses everything and all users effected regain their tokens (providing additional incentive to the social network users to not tolerate bots). The bot farm would have to shift its mining elsewhere immediately or else it would continue paying the social network in mining resources (i.e. computer time).
  • Content creators of games would be able to tap into the mining power of the users playing their games to add a revenue source and help offset their costs to be part of the network.

Perhaps, users could also mine elsewhere and then transfer funds to their social network wallet of choice and exchange for tokens to interact on that network. This would open up an entire marketplace of services within the social network environment.

The value of a social network is now the amount of tokens created on it’s network * the exchange rate of those tokens on the open market. Followers and likes have measurable economic value, and Judas would be paying 30 tokens instead of earning tokens as a bot troll.

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This morning, I was browsing through the headlines on Rueters.com. After reading about how Obama is all talk and no action and how Hillary is in the political fight of her life, I couldn’t help but read about the Tokyo marathon runner who solves the mystery of his chest pain: bleeding nipples and not a cardiovascular issue.

HUH?

Yes, bleeding nipples. This was a mystery? Apparently, he attributes it to chafing and not excessive titty twisters before the race.

What does this have to do with a better future? Well, one could argue that Brian Jones will certainly be a little perkier after his marathon, but the better future was part of a Rueter’s survey:

Growing confidence in the future and slightly warmer views of President George W. Bush and Congress put Americans in a better mood this month, according to a Reuters/Zogby poll released on Wednesday.

… Approval ratings for Bush climbed to 34 percent from 31 percent last month, and positive ratings for Congress inched up from 14 percent to a still-low 17 percent.

I’m feeling optimistic about the future. Bush signed a good stimulus package. More people are watching The Big Idea with Donny Deutsch. The Federal Reserve is finally waking up… Then another article catches my eye: LIBERAL INTOLERANCE:

The proportion of Americans reporting they feel less free to speak than they used to climbed from 13 percent in 1954 to 24 percent in 2005.

Guess they haven’t been reading many blogs lately. The first comment I received on my post about the ultra-boring two hour infomercial for Ford and Microsoft (aka Knight Rider) was the F-bomb. The only comment I received about the Bush Stimulus package being the next Big Idea was a tirade by a New Yorker that was longer than my post and didn’t address the point of my post.

Doesn’t seem like a lack of self expression is really present. I think the flaw with James L. Gibson’s study is how subjective it is to interpretation. For example:

The proportion who agree that “all people feel as free to say what they think as they used to” dropped from 56 percent to 43 percent.

Feeling “free to say what they think”? What exactly does that mean? Sounds like a personal problem.

After having slept through most of the 2 hour premiere of the new Knight Rider on NBC last night, I was about to say it would have one season of life. That was until I paid closer attention to the sponsors: Ford and Microsoft.

The new K.I.T is a Mustang. Depending upon what happens to sales of the mustang over the next television season, we can expect Knight Rider to be back because Ford will be willing to pay for the show.

Microsoft has considerable interest in NBC (MSNBC). Depending upon how well Ford vehicles with Microsoft’s Sync system sell, you can bet that Microsoft will be willing to help pay to keep the show on their television partner, NBC.

In much more simple terms: Knight Rider is an infomercial for Ford and Microsoft. I’ve tried this before on a much lower budget when I produced a television talk show starring Christine Eads. It is a brilliant idea if sales pan out for Ford and Microsoft.

Is Microsoft on the verge of creating the modern equivalent to Soap Operas? Will we call them Sync Operas? Stay tuned to NBC and Knight Rider to find out!

What would happen if everyone in America watches The Big Idea with Donny Deutsch on CNBC? First, there would be a run on the cable companies because you can only get CNBC on cable. Second, fellow blogger Tony Iovino would take his $600 check he’ll receive from the Federal government in May and actually cash it to invest it into a new invention (and he would start using the vastly superior WordPress blogging system). Third, the US economy would flourish.

Today, Bush signed his stimulus package, creating checks for millions of people in our economy. Lots of people love to complain about the symantics of the deal. Call it welfare. Call it a rebate. Call it what you want, it is our Federal government giving money to people that live in America.

Using some of the people I’ve seen on The Big Idea as an example, what those $600 checks have the potential to do is generate billions (yes, you read that correctly, BILLIONS) of dollars in revenue/income for Americans. How? Well, you should watch The Big Idea. The show has featured scores of people who have started their business for little more (sometimes even less) than $600. These people has created jobs, used resources that support other businesses, and made people a lot of money.

Sure, if everyone who receives a check goes a spends it on a toy at Walmart, it won’t do much for boosting the economy. However, let’s have a little fun with the math here. 130,000,000 Americans are going to receive a check. If even 0.1% of the people who receive checks become Donny Deutsch success stories, we are talking about generating $130,000,000,000 of revenue for the US economy over the next year! That’s correct, just one-tenth of one percent of the people who receive the checks need to become Donny Deutsch success stories for the checks to pay for themselves in just two year. One-tenth of one percent. That is about the same as a run-of-network banner advertisement on ValueClick!

Anyone who says the Bush stimulus package of a $600 tax rebate is not going to stimulate the US Economy hasn’t been watching The Big Idea with Donny Deutsch. I’ve seen more millionaires made from $600 or less on that show than I ever thought was possible. The moral of the story: Your wealth is what you make of it.

Every time I watch that show, I’m completely inspired. Regular people making it big because they had a dream that they pursued. My favorite episode was a few days ago. I can’t remember the guy’s name, but there was a venture capitalist on the show who said that the “side job” never becomes the next million dollar idea. Got me thinking about how many “side jobs” I’ve had over the years. None of them took off. Watching the show, I see nearly all of the stories have something in come: they quit their job went after the dream.

What dream is worth dreaming but not pursuing? Time to take the plunge. Grab that $600 tax rebate and do something with it!

Nearly a week into 2008, and I am long overdue for a post. What better way than to recap my favorites of 2007:

Favorite blog on my blogroll: 800lb Gorilla

Favorite color: Powder blue from the San Diego Charger jerseys

Favorite day: Day before my birthday (My brother and I ran the LA Triathlon Sprint)

Favorite city: Many to choose from, but gotta love Chicago (even during February)

Favorite SkyMall gadget: Gotta love the Gravity Defyer Shoes

Favorite conspiracy theory: Tom Cruise was cloned by Xenu and the clone is the crazy one we’ve seen in recent years

Favorite book: If I Did It. Just kidding. The Seven Lost Secrets of Success. Joe Vitale has mastered success and is passing it along. That’s the way it should be!

Favorite moment at work: There are so many to choose from. While the Montel Williams show was interesting and The Talking Show was a first, neither of them is the top choice. Not quite the top either, the GBK Oscars Gift Suite was certainly enjoyable, as was the Scriptwriter’s Showcase. I even learned about how bad the strike would be months before it happened. Even though having Reggie Bush on the cover of the magazine was nice, that too was not my favorite moment. My favorite moment at work definitely has to be when I realized I had a great advertisement.

Favorite dance event: 2007 US Open. The Moorpark College Swing Dance Team received second place in their very first team competition at the US Open. I was one of the founding members of the college club at Moorpark, so it was particularly enjoyable to see them do so well in their first competition.

Favorite radio moment: When I was doing the Gadget Panel Radio show while on the road, heading to a Dodgers game. My phone cut out and Gadget Panelist Vadim was unable to get himself on the phone circuit. Great radio!

Favorite blog I didn’t write: The blog recapping my trip to New Zealand with the 20GB of pictures and photos I took while down under.

Favorite Movie: Ratatouille. The little ones teach us so much in life.

Favorite Website: Ext JS. The web’s future is so bright it’s gotta wear shades. My favorite demo is the desktop sample.  My nerd side is shining.

The talKing Show host, Christine Eads, learns some Salsa from Four time World Mayan Salsa Dance Champion Liz Lira. One of my favorite comedians, Adam Hunter, even tries out some moves (I think more moves on Christine than on the actual dance floor).

Liz Lira is a great dancer and a wonderful personality. If you have a chance to meet her, you’ll know exactly what I’m talking about. She’s a very dedicated dancer and one of the nicest dance instructors I know. The dance community needs more Liz Liras!


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Christine Eads is the host of a new variety television talkshow: The talKing Show. In this clip, she talks with the show’s DJ D.J. about American Idol, Blake Lewis, and beatboxing. She even tries out some beatboxing herself. She should stick to her day job with hosting her XM Radio show Broadminded and The talKing Show. I don’t think we’ll be seeing her on American Idol any time soon 😛

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Originally posted on the Gadget Panel

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I had the Home Theater Watch at the 2007 GBK Oscar show. Like I mentioned in previous blogs, Billy Wirth, Shawn Hatosy, Joel Moore, and Warren G all loved the Home Theater Watch. It wasn’t a huge hit for the female celebrities, but there were plenty of women taking a look at the watch.

But this isn’t about the Oscars or celebrities. This is about my very own Home Theater Watch experience. Now, I’ll admit that I’m not much of a nerd. While I’m sure that my sister is laughing her butt off right now at that statement, I swear I’m not a nerd. Honestly! This watch is actually really cool.

Plug it into your MAC or PC. It uses a micro USB cable and is auto detected by both in my case. Although, be a lil’ careful with the MAC because its wide open folks! Don’t start deleting files that you *think* you don’t need. You probably do.

Anyway, getting back to the coolness of this watch. I was totally blown away by this cool product. It really is like Joel Moore said, “It’s like an iPod for your wrist.” Yet the Home Theater Watch also has the added coolness factor of being a watch. Something you wear on your wrist that tells time. I was sporting it at the office today, and people were all begging me to see what the watch can do. There are dozens or people who have written about the Home Theater Watch:

Gear Live had something to say
Luxist recommends it while you are standing in line while out and about
SciFi.com even pointed out that you can watch a full length film or a couple of episodes of Prison Break
Coolest Gadgets pointed out the usefulness during a traffic jam
Wrist Dreams… Well, I’m not sure what to make about their name to be honest with you -P
Book of Joe wants the manufacturer to promise “Your friends and family will be eager to spend time with you….”. How do you become the most popular blogging anesthesiologist? I’m sure that the first step is to start blogging
So, everyone at work is following me around…

Does it play movies? Yep!

Does it play music? Yep!

Does it have a voice recorder? Uh…

I didn’t even realize this until after I had shot the video. See and hear the Home Theater Watch video I posted on youtube.

So, when the controller came by my office to tell me that one of my biggest marketing channels had posted a FAT profit for Q1, I was excited because I had it all on audio. I was testing the recording feature when she came by, so I’m not going to make a practice out of recording conversations, but it just kinda happened. Hopefully the FBI will make note of that when they scan this website and let me slide -D

And, BTW. At the time I wrote this blog, there was a 5 question survey on gadgetuniverse.com that claims you can enter to win a Home Theater Watch. I don’t know the details or if there is a deadline, but this watch is worth giving it a shot. I’ll take another one!

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I’ve posted a few things about Mr. Fire, Dr. Joe Vitale regarding the Gravity Defyer Shoes. I am an owner of several of his books and frequent reader of his Mr. Fire Blog. Today, he posted a blog about an amazing hoax he hired Alan Abel to stage in order to promote his incredible book “The Attractor Factor”.

I spent some time on Alan’s website today reading the various stories about his hoaxes and watching video from some of the most entertaining hoaxes I’ve ever seen. My personal favorite was in regards to the Citizens Against Public Breast Feeding, which loosely ties into my previous blog about the Tiddy Bear.

Well, see for yourself. You will get a great chuckle…

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