California Propositions for 2010

It’s that time again! Time to head to the polls and vote for Congress members, Senators, City Council, etc. And in California, we hit the polls for the largest exercise in democracy in the world: California Propositions! Here are my takes on each of the Propositions open for voting this Tuesday…

Proposition 19 – The weed ballot. They are even making this section of the ballot out of hemp paper! I’ve heard all kinds of stories from both sides on this. I even heard a commercial against proposition 19 that states that an employee could get stoned off his ass every day but a company couldn’t do anything about it unless they ran over someone with a forklift. Well, those weren’t the exact words, but it was pretty much along those lines.

The problem with the logic in most of the anti-19 campaigning is that it assumes that California will suddenly become 30 million potheads overnight and that this law would give weed smokers diplomatic immunity. Neither of those are going to take place, and I guarantee you that if someone shows up stoned to work, a company will have every right to reprimand (including fire) that employee just as if the employee showed up drunk! The valid argument is the lost federal funding that California will suffer *IF* the Federal government withholds grants, education funding etc. However, there is a very simple solution to that. Don’t give the federal government their share of the taxes they put on *OUR* gasoline we use in California. If they want the tax, they can come invade us and take it.

I’m not suggesting the above because I support proposition 19. However, I am most certainly supporting the free will of the states over our federal government. Certainly, we need a strong central government, but if the federal government wants to pick and choose who it gives funding too because a state’s population does something it doesn’t like, that’s nothing short of tyranny.

Proposition 20 – A panel redistricts instead of politicians. Allowing politicians to redistrict themselves is like asking a class of kindergartners to define how much recess time they want instead of classroom time.

Proposition 21 – More taxes disguised as “helping the environment” and state park funding. My favorite part of this prop is that it will raise $500 million/year but will only bring another $250 million to the state parks. That’s because the other $250 million will be siphoned away from the state parks and wasted on something else. Here’s what I’d support: the tax with the state parks still receiving the same funding they receive right now. This way, our politicians would have to come up with some other way to scam money out of our pockets. What a shame this proposition is!

Proposition 22 – The Robbing Peter to Pay Paul Proposition. Local taxes and taxes we pay on gasoline have been stolen for years to pay for items other than what they are supposed to pay for. Of course, having done so for so long, there are so many organizations that live off these funds they weren’t supposed to be getting paid from in the first place. What this proposition boils down to is sealing the gap of a taxation windfall for our state government. They need more money? Easy! Just increase the gasoline tax… Can’t get a bill passed to increase taxes somewhere else? No problem! Just increase the gasoline tax… Well, this prop will hold tax spenders (let’s just call them what they are!) accountable for their taxes.

I’m willing to bet lunch at Tomato Joe’s Pizza that our gas taxes more than cover the amount of work we need on our roads! Ultimately, this prop could lead to lower gas prices because I’m willing to bet we are overpaying gas taxes because those funds are being used for so many other things that otherwise wouldn’t have funding to save their lives. Our current policies are like supporting the loser brother because he’s part of the trust fund. This proposition is the closest we’re going to get to “opt-out” taxes.

Proposition 23 – Someone’s blowing smoke up our asses… Is clean air regulation really costing California 1 million jobs? Would the recession suddenly end if these regulations no longer existed? Is anyone really stupid enough to believe that? I suppose we’ll find out when the votes are cast for this proposition…

Proposition 24 – This is a taxing pissing match. However, let’s just look at the latest business news that shows rising profits by several large businesses while unemployment remains high. That’s not to say that I don’t support business tax incentives. However, the ones we have in place clearly are not promoting job creation. I could write for ages on the types of business tax credits that will stimulate job creation, but that’s for another blog at another time…

Proposition 25 – The Fiscal Irresponsibility Proposition – This is the Congressional equivalent to cutting off your nose to spite your face. Having a 1/2 vote for the budget is dangerous. It means that whatever political party rules with a majority will have their way with our budget. I’m not a big fan of this. They cloak the dangers of this budgeting by keeping the 2/3 majority for increased taxes and the income penalty to members of the state Congress. However, taxing is only one side of the coin. The more important side of the coin is spending. A government can easily overspend! Just look at our current Federal government. A government can easily overtax as well, but the ramifications of overtaxes are far less dangerous than overspending.

Proposition 26 – Written Behind Closed Doors LOL ROFLMAO!!! The anti-26 campaign has just been hilarious! I can’t stop laughing when I hear the ads on the radio talking about how this prop was drafted to big-oil because they want us to pay for oil spills. I’m still trying to figure out how that was deciphered from the actual language of the proposition. This prop seems pretty straight forward. Taxation by any other name is still a taxation.

Proposition 27 – So funny that this is on the same ballot as Prop 20! This is like watching two guys argue in downtown… Hilarious!!!

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  1. 1 California Proposition Results for 2010 « Feed My Blog

    […] chimed in last week about what I thought about the ballot measures on this year’s ballot. Taking at look at the […]




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